Filling for Divorce in Arkansas?

In order to obtain a divorce in Arkansas, you must meet the following requirements:

1.  You must be a resident of Arkansas for at least 60 days before filing.  You cannot get a divorce for at least 30 days after you file for divorce, and generally, it takes longer than 30 days.

2.  You must be a resident of the County in which you are filing.

3.  You must have a witness who can testify in person or by affidavit that you resided in Arkansas for more than 60 days before filing, and that you and your spouse have separated.

4.  You must have grounds for divorce against your spouse.  The most common grounds are indignities, which may include continuing physical or verbal abuse.  Other grounds include adultery, insanity, impotence, and habitual drunkenness.

5.  You must either have a written property settlement agreement with your spouse or be prepared to have the judge decide how you and your spouse must divide your property.

6.  If you have minor children with your spouse, you must have a written agreement for custody and visitation with your spouse, and you must provide for child suppport.   If you and your spouse can’t agree on custody, visitation, and child support, the judge will decide those issues for you.  Child support is usually set according to the Arkansas Child Support Chart, which is located at https://courts.arkansas.gov/forms-and-publications/arkansas-child-support-guidelines.

7.  In Pulaski County, parents of minor children are required to attend and complete a transparenting course before they can obtain a divorce.

8.  The judge must approve your divorce decree.

If you have decided you need to divorce your spouse, please call me at 501-604-4525.

 

 

About Administrator

I am Steven R. Davis. I have practiced law in the Little Rock area for more than 30 years. My areas of practice include bankruptcy, Social Security Disability and SSI, criminal defense, divorce, custody, and visitation, and wills, trust and probate. I offer prompt, personal service at a reasonable price.
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